Book Roulette: Ender’s Game [#413]

photo from npr.org

Ender’s Game, by Orson Scott Card

I guess this book technically belongs pre-generator, but oh well.

There. I’ve done it. I have now, officially, read a book of science fiction.

Honestly, I could have picked worse. In talking with a friend the other night about Orson Scott Card, she mentioned he was “hit or miss.” When I told her I was reading Ender’s Game, she got a big smile on her face and said, “That’s a hit.”

It is a hit. I imagine Card goes more in depth into each of the characters as the series progresses, but I got a sense of their depth even from this first book. I liked to read Ender’s progression through the Battle School. Everyone loves a good underdog story.

I first picked this book off my shelf in light of the upcoming movie, and then I started to read more about people’s protests against the movie because of Card’s personal beliefs on gay marriage. I was interested, in part because I wanted to see if his beliefs made their way into the book.

News flash: They don’t. In fact, an argument could be made on the other end. Ender’s relationship with Alai, for example, is very sincere. I want to say tender, but I feel that would take it too far.

Here’s my take on the whole idea of protesting Card. I think it’s stupid. I’m not against gay marriage, far from it, in fact. But I don’t think it does any good to protest a movie because the man who created the original story has a personal view on something. He hasn’t come out kicking and screaming to all of the gay men and women in the movie industry (or any other industry, for that matter). He simply has an opinion. There’s no reason to get your panties in a bunch over it.

I would highly recommend Ender’s Game to anyone (gay, pro-gay, anti-gay or otherwise), because I think it’s a great book. It’s a story about an extraordinary boy and his efforts to save the world. It’s written well (especially the introduction. Note: do not skimp on the introduction to this book) and it offers a message to young adults that anything is possible. They have their whole lives ahead of them, and they can accomplish great things.

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About katepadilla

I write for the Spencer Daily Reporter in Spencer, Iowa. I keep blogs lifebythebooks, Save Me, San Francisco, and Beauty and Beast Buy a House. I'm also hard at work writing a short story collection inspired by the music of Train.

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