Sneak Peak: The House on the Cliff, by Charlotte Williams

It’s featured author week again! I’m so excited to bring you Charlotte Williams, author of The House on the Cliff. Today I’ll have an excerpt of her novel, tomorrow I’ll have my review, and Wednesday I’ll have an exclusive interview with Charlotte.

For today’s “sneak peak”, and with Charlotte Williams’ The House on the Cliff in mind, I wanted to share with you the description of the structure for which the book was named. The house belongs to the Morgan family; the son, Gwyndion, is a client of Jessica Mayhew, and plays an important role in the book. There’s mystery behind the Morgan family, but what I liked was how this mystery appears even in the house itself.

It was a few miles away from a tiny fishing village, perched on a cliff top in solitary splendor, overlooking St. Bride’s Bay. Before announcing my arrival I stopped the car on the side of the road and peered at the house through the big iron gates. It was tremendously grand. A darned sight grander than I’d expected. One of those Jacobean piles with tall chimneys, pointy gables, and castellated whatnots all the way round the roof. It looked like something out of a fairy story. There were latticed windows everywhere, and barley-twist pillars around the porch, and carved stone garlands drooping down over the front coo. But impressive as it all was, when you looked more closely, you could see that parts of it, especially on the wings, were crumbling away. The kind of house that, however much money you spent on it, would always be falling to pieces. Nevertheless, it was still beautiful. Unique. Rococo. Baroque even.

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About katepadilla

I write for the Spencer Daily Reporter in Spencer, Iowa. I keep blogs lifebythebooks, Save Me, San Francisco, and Beauty and Beast Buy a House. I'm also hard at work writing a short story collection inspired by the music of Train.

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